Archive for the ‘Reputation’ Category

The Microsoft “User” Experience

May 15, 2014

Do You Enjoy The Microsoft User Experience?

I don’t.

Today, I turn on my computer to see this:

Microsoft User Experience Updates

Fifteen “important” updates, 94.7MB’s worth.

Really?

My reaction: something’s terribly wrong.

But what? How bad is it? Was my computer already hurt?

It’s just not a comforting “welcome-to-a-new-day” moment.

Part two of the experience is hardly warm and fuzzy, either.

You have to restart your computer.

Not knowing what, if any, impact, these “important” updates may have on other software.

Only after you restarting will you learn.

But, please, restart your computer. Trust us:

Microsoft User Experience Important Updates

On this day, after restarting, I “experienced” trouble connecting to the internet.

Due to one of Microsoft’s 15 important updates?

I don’t know.

But it happened.

Nothing about the experience is enjoyable.

The text, process, multiple steps, time required, the operational uncertainty.

All uncomfortable, at best.

Why does Microsoft continue this experience?

Is this the best the U.S.-based business can do?

Does anyone enjoy it?

Do you?

It’s almost as if we have to put up with Microsoft.

Because that’s the way, “It’s always been.”

 

 


Twitter: @schwartznow

Digital Hubs:  Here or Here

 

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Chipotle Needs Beano

May 6, 2014

What’s Wrong With Chipotle?

James Covert writing for The New York Post:

“Proxy advisory firm ISS … blasted lavish pay packages for the Mexican-food chain’s two CEOs, who together earned $58 million last year, capping a a three-year run in which they’ve pocketed a combined $300 million.”

Two CEOs.

$58 million in a year.

On top of that, Chipotle is raising your prices.

Per CNBC:

“Getting a steak burrito bowl? That’ll be 8.3 percent more in New York City. While you’re at it, be prepared to fork over 11.1 percent more for guacamole.”

So, the bosses get more.

And get to charge you more.

What do investors think?

 

Chipotle Stock Pain

That “blue box”? Pain. Investors waiting to break even.

 

Unless you sold Chipotle in February, you’re in pain.

Its stock is broken technically.

Bearish below its 50MA on a daily chart.

Any “long” investor in that “blue box” holds Chipotle stock at a loss.

CEO pay, aside.

Price hikes, aside.

I’m talking business.

And reputation management.

Chipotle’s chart is broken.

$110 off its high.

Chipotle, a Colorado business, needs Beano.

Eat that.

But want to invest?

Consult your advisor.

 

 


Twitter: @schwartznow

Digital Hubs:  Here or Here

 

Hit by Heartbleed

April 9, 2014

The Heartbleed Hit List: The Passwords You Need to Change Right Now

In this order:

  1. Read that article.
  2. Opened Tumblr.
  3. Saw the “fine print’.

 

Heartbleed Password Privacy

Read the fine print.



Changing password.

Make that passwords.

Plural.

Across many platforms:

Heartbleed Warning Passwords

Warning from Tumblr – Yahoo.



Because doing so will protect my privacy.

Right?

 

 


Twitter: @schwartznow

Digital Hubs:  Here or Here

 

“Click”: New Media Journalism

March 24, 2014

Risks Abound as Reporters Play in Traffic

David Carr writing in The New York Times:

“If I were being paid by the click for this column, I might have begun it this way: Will an oppressive emphasis on ‘click bait’ mean that the news ends up imprisoned by transgendered models posing in disgraceful listicles accompanied by kidnapped nude kittens?”

His column centers on the business of journalism in a new media world:

“Now that metrics are part of the news agenda, all of the sticks are in the air. Just because something is popular does not make it worthy, but ignoring audience engagement is a sure route to irrelevance.”

@carr2n concludes his opinion piece with a cat picture.

Why not?

But my cat pic is better than his.

#BreakingNews #Developing #JustIn #Exclusive:

Meet my neighbor: Holy Gotham City, Batman! – the Caped Crusader uncovered:

Cat  Journalism News Clicks Business

Look at the shadow: Bat-Cat. #NewJournalism

Look at the shadow. Bat-cat.

New-media journalism “click.”

Some reporters and firms struggle in the new media balance of engagement and journalism.

Others thrive.

My tip: all things in moderation, strategically.

Follow your plan.

Your have one, right?

 


Twitter: @schwartznow

Digital Hubs:  Here or Here

Digital Advertising’s Crisis

March 24, 2014

A ‘Crisis’ in Online Ads: One-Third of Traffic Is Bogus

Suzanne Vranica with Mike Shields writing in The Wall Street Journal:

“About 36% of all Web traffic is considered fake, the product of computers hijacked by viruses and programmed to visit sites, according to estimates cited recently by the Interactive Advertising Bureau trade group.”

Bots, click fraud, fake traffic.

It’s widespread, says The WSJ.

With a catch: your company must be online.

There’s no choice, right?:

“Spending on digital advertising—which includes social media and mobile devices—is expected to rise nearly 17% to $50 billion in the U.S. this year. That would be about 28% of total U.S. ad spending. Just five years ago, digital accounted for 16%.”

So, ditching the digital marketplace is a hard sell.

After all, it’s growing by double digits.

But what do you tell your CEO when asked:

“Can you prove to me our ad dollars are not wasted due to fraud?”

Monitor and audit all you want.

Right now, however, assume some of your online ad budget is squandered.

Misspent monies.

Inform your CEO.

And demand recompense. Restitution.

Insist on proof that consumers signed up for services, products or deals advertised.

Without the evidence, here’s a current best practice:

“Few marketers say they plan to cut back on digital advertising. Instead advertisers are getting more aggressive in monitoring what they are getting and in demanding reimbursement if fraud is uncovered.”

I would also tie your media buyer’s compensation to “make goods.” Free ad space.

Digital advertising is becoming a bigger slice of the marketing pie.

But your firm’s bottom line is involved.

And is your CEO’s reputation.

Your best strategy is planning and reporting online advertising tactics and results with credibility.

Credibility demands honesty.

And, honestly, there is fraud online.

Digital domination may be in the cards.

Ignoring fake traffic need not be.


Twitter: @schwartznow

Digital Hubs:  Here or Here

Bloomberg Reporting Probe

May 11, 2013

Feds Examine “Use” of Bloomberg Terminals

CNBC’s Steve Liesman writes:

Both the Federal Reserve and the US Treasury Department are examining the extent to which usage information of top officials might have been tracked by Bloomberg journalists.

Liesman also talked with an ex-Bloomberg worker:

The former Bloomberg employee who worked in the editorial section recalled calling up the information on Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner ‘just for fun’ and displaying the information to new recruits ‘to show how powerful’ the Bloomberg terminals were.

Spying, snooping and journalism are not the same practices.

Bloomberg reporting faces a crisis of trust, as I type this.

The firm’s reputation is at risk.

Gaming Social Media

April 25, 2013

Researchers Call Out Twitter Celebrities With Suspicious Followings

Nicole Perlroth writes:

There are now more than two dozen online services willing to sell fake followers. Based on the number of fake accounts offered through those services — excluding overlapping accounts — Mr. Stroppa and Mr. De Micheli estimate that there are now more than 20 million fake accounts on Twitter. Those accounts can be sold to multiple buyers. At quoted rates, the two said a conservative estimate is that fake Twitter followers offer potential for a $40 million to $360 million business.

She discusses, among others, a Colorado congressman.

Once watched a former Colorado TV reporter gain several thousand “new” Twitter followers a day.

Asked him privately about it: “I must have gotten on a list.” Right.

Gaming social media?

It’s your reputation.

Finding Trusted News

April 22, 2013

The Pressure to Be the TV News Leader Tarnishes a Big Brand

Reporter David Carr:

Still, when big news breaks, we instinctively look to CNN. We want CNN to be good, to be worthy of its moment. That impulse took a beating last week. On Wednesday at 1:45 p.m., the correspondent John King reported that a suspect had been arrested. It was a big scoop that turned out to be false.

In one of the most defining moments of the #BostonExplosion story — CNN blew it, while the world watched. It was not alone:

Mr. King, a good reporter in possession of a bad set of facts, was joined by The AP, Fox News, The Boston Globe and others, but the stumble could not have come at a worse time for CNN. When viewers arrived in droves – the audience tripled to 1.05 million, from 365,000 the week before, according to Nielsen ratings supplied by Horizon Media – CNN failed in its core mission.

This is now a case study.

Not totally, “How Mr. King failed (he did).”

More, “Communicating in a new media world.”

Crisis communications tests the best. Failure is not an option.

I need to trust you, when “it” goes down.

Yet, during this crisis, big news outlets failed me. Over and over.

The “King” failed.

So, is your news team is up to a crisis, beforehand?

I know big, worldwide crises from inside and outside.

I already know, you’re not ready.

Down deep, your team, lacking the resources of a CNN, knows it, too.

Trust me. Just ask them.

Bottom Line: Now is the time to be ready for “next.”

You need a plan, the right people on the bus, training and execution.

The stakes are as high as a business will ever face.

Your reputation is on the line.

Trust is about getting it right.


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