Archive for the ‘Physics’ Category

Why Do You Hate Math?

May 29, 2014

Prof. Edward Frenkel, University of California, Berkeley:

“Imagine that you had to take an art class in which you were taught only how to paint a fence or a wall but were never shown the paintings of the great masters. Would that make you an art lover? Years later you will talk to your friends and say ‘Oh my gosh! I hated art at school, I was so bad at it.’ What you would really be saying is ‘I was bad at painting the fence.’ And likewise with mathematics people often say ‘Oh, I was so bad at math, I hate math.’ but what they are really saying is ‘I was bad at painting the fence.’”

Picture math as an expression of beauty.

Tell your friends, your children, math is beautiful.

Then pause. Smile.

Let them take it from there.

Math is amazing.

Use it to paint the world.

 

 

 


Twitter: @schwartznow

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Earth’s Great Nor’easter

March 26, 2014

LIVE: Spring Blizzard Cuts Power to Thousands in New England

The Great Red Spot is signature Jupiter.

Jupiter’s giant storm could hold two to three earth-sized planets.

On earth?

We’ve got something, too:

Nor'Easter

Giant Nor’easter. Source: @jencarfagno, The Weather Channel

A giant Nor’easter.

Could be the largest storm on earth, as I type this.

Watch this amazing timelapse.

A closer look:

Nor'Easter March 2014

Intense wind field. Nor’easter. 26 March 2014

Blizzard conditions and power outages reported.

Waves exceeded 10 feet.

Wind gusted up to 80 miles an hour, too.

Further evidence of my musing, “Is spring broken?”

Storm had @JimCantore written all over it.

Even other meteorologists called his name:

Meteorologists warn @JimCantore. Source: @gdimeweather

Meteorologists warn @JimCantore. Source: @gdimeweather

Meteorologist Cantore answered the bell.

He’s in there, trust me. Scraping snow off the pole:

Nor'Easter Jim Cantore  Jeff Schwartz

Nor’easter engulfs @JimCantore. Source: The Weather Channel

Here’s his “live” encounter.

Can you imagine if this Nor’easter made landfall?

Its main “punch” remained out to sea.

So, unless George Clooney and the Andrea Gail make a comeback, this is not “The Perfect Storm.”

It’s vast, however.

Easily visible from space.

Probably from Jupiter, with binoculars or a small telescope.

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is hundreds of years old.

Earth’s Nor’easter will likely “tire” in days.

The result: it’s news, but more weather and science news.

Some amazing science in-progress.

Impossible to pass up.

The visuals, alone.

One day, perhaps, an astronaut’s “live” coverage of The Great Red spot?

Until then, enjoying a great Nor’easter.

From the safety of satellite technology.

 


Twitter: @schwartznow

Digital Hubs:  Here or Here

What Was Over Atlanta?

February 25, 2014

Cool Clouds Over Atlanta

Cloud show during Atlanta rush hour. Source: @ScottTufts

Meteorologist @JenCarfagno of The Weather Channel said “undulatus asperatus” clouds put on the display that lit up social media:

“Undulatus asperatus translates to ‘roughened waves’ – Looks like an angry sea, doesn’t it?” 

Science writer and meteorologist Anthony Sagliani of Accuweather said a gravity wave packet created the awesome cloud structure:

“Gravity wave packet” over Georiga. Source: @anthonywx 

Here’s another view from Jeremy Campbell of 11Alive.com:

Source: Jeremy Campbell @Jeremy11alive

Per Wikipedia:

“Undulatus asperatus (or alternately, asperatus) is a cloud formation, proposed in 2009 as a separate cloud classification by the founder of the Cloud Appreciation Society. If successful it will be the first cloud formation added since cirrus intortus in 1951 to the International Cloud Atlas of the World Meteorological Organization.”

Got my vote.

Neat science.

Cool clouds.

Happy Birthday, Richard Feynman, Physicist, Pioneer

May 12, 2012
“I was born not knowing and have only had a little time to change that here and there.”

Richard Feynman, Ph.D.

One of the most respected scientists of the past century, Richard Feynman was a brilliant physicist, Nobel Laureate and U.S. Educator.

I had the pleasure to know him at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Enjoyed Dr. Feynman presenting his theory on quantum computing.

After his talk there was a long pause.

Then, a world-class engineer asked: “But what about stimulated emission?”

Dr. Feynman: “I never said it would be easy.” Classic Feynman.

May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988

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