Archive for the ‘Internet’ Category

Air “Bombs”: Gnarly Weather

June 27, 2014

Gnarly Sky Telegraphs Meteorological Air “Bombs.”

Posted this on Tumblr. Sharing here, too. Hey, WordPress, Yahoo is easier:

Mammatus Virga Colorado T-Storm

Gnarly Virga – Mammatus under T-Storm: Windy Downbursts

Gnarly sky under a T-storm.

Rain evaporating in dry air on the way down.

Dramatic, ragged cloud structures.

Potentially dangerous.

Violent wind “air bombs,” gusty downbursts up to 60mph or more possible.

Another view:

Inverted Mammatus Virga J

“Inverted” view Virga – Mammatus Wind Downburst

Same pic using photoshop feature “inverted.”

No rain.

But evaporating rain on the way down rocked my house, like an air bomb.

Airplane travel impacted into Denver International Airport, where a Severe Weather Warning was issued by the National Weather Service.

Air “bombs” – downbursts – are both gnarly and dangerous.

A sight to see.

And feel.

Blown away.

So, now: seeing is knowing.


Twitter: @schwartznow

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Apple WWDC14: Safari DuckDuckGo

June 3, 2014

Apple builds path to future with WWDC software refresh

Some Apple WWDC14 Keynote highlights included:

  • OS X Yosemite
  • Continuity
  • iOS 8
  • HealthKit
  • HomeKit
  • Swift
Safari DuckDuckGo Privacy WWDC14

Safari. Apple

 

Executive Craig Federighi – (a.k.a. “Hairforce One”) – also stressed privacy and security features several times.

 

Per Apple’s website, Safari will include a DuckDuckGo option:
 

“Safari now gives you more control over your privacy on the web. You can open one Safari window in Private Browsing mode — which doesn’t save your browsing history — while keeping others in regular browsing mode. So while you do your online banking privately in one window, your browsing history is still being saved while you surf in another. You can also now search the web using DuckDuckGo, a search engine that doesn’t track you.”

 
 
 


Twitter: @schwartznow

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The Microsoft “User” Experience

May 15, 2014

Do You Enjoy The Microsoft User Experience?

I don’t.

Today, I turn on my computer to see this:

Microsoft User Experience Updates

Fifteen “important” updates, 94.7MB’s worth.

Really?

My reaction: something’s terribly wrong.

But what? How bad is it? Was my computer already hurt?

It’s just not a comforting “welcome-to-a-new-day” moment.

Part two of the experience is hardly warm and fuzzy, either.

You have to restart your computer.

Not knowing what, if any, impact, these “important” updates may have on other software.

Only after you restarting will you learn.

But, please, restart your computer. Trust us:

Microsoft User Experience Important Updates

On this day, after restarting, I “experienced” trouble connecting to the internet.

Due to one of Microsoft’s 15 important updates?

I don’t know.

But it happened.

Nothing about the experience is enjoyable.

The text, process, multiple steps, time required, the operational uncertainty.

All uncomfortable, at best.

Why does Microsoft continue this experience?

Is this the best the U.S.-based business can do?

Does anyone enjoy it?

Do you?

It’s almost as if we have to put up with Microsoft.

Because that’s the way, “It’s always been.”

 

 


Twitter: @schwartznow

Digital Hubs:  Here or Here

 

Heartbleed Suspect Nabbed

April 17, 2014

Heartbleed Bug Hacker Charged by RCMP

Suspected Heartbleed hacker, Stephen Arthuro Solis-Reyes, 19, arrested.

Press release from The Royal Canadian Mounted Police:

“The RCMP treated this breach of security as a high priority case and mobilized the necessary resources to resolve the matter as quickly as possible. Investigators from National Division, along with our counterparts in ‘O’ Division have been working tirelessly over the last four days analyzing data, following leads, conducting interviews, obtaining and executing legal authorizations and liaising with our partners,” said Assistant Commissioner Gilles Michaud.”

According to The Washington Post:

“Earlier this week, the Canada Revenue Agency said an attacker using Heartbleed stole 900 Social Security numbers. It was the first known case of a hacker taking advantage of the security flaw for malicious purposes.”

Okay, I’ve been changing passwords left and right.

But now a 19-year-old is in custody.

Jailed by The Royal Gendarmerie of Canada:

Heartbleed Suspected Arrested RCMP

Credit: Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Wikipedia.

Mounted Police.

Helped by “O” Division.

Not a double-O, as in a “Bond” movie.

Single-O. Still cool enough.

And a teen.

In Canada.

Knew it all along.

This means the Heartbleed scare is over.

That my privacy is assured.

Right?

 

 


Twitter: @schwartznow

Digital Hubs:  Here or Here

 

Hit by Heartbleed

April 9, 2014

The Heartbleed Hit List: The Passwords You Need to Change Right Now

In this order:

  1. Read that article.
  2. Opened Tumblr.
  3. Saw the “fine print’.

 

Heartbleed Password Privacy

Read the fine print.



Changing password.

Make that passwords.

Plural.

Across many platforms:

Heartbleed Warning Passwords

Warning from Tumblr – Yahoo.



Because doing so will protect my privacy.

Right?

 

 


Twitter: @schwartznow

Digital Hubs:  Here or Here

 

“Click”: New Media Journalism

March 24, 2014

Risks Abound as Reporters Play in Traffic

David Carr writing in The New York Times:

“If I were being paid by the click for this column, I might have begun it this way: Will an oppressive emphasis on ‘click bait’ mean that the news ends up imprisoned by transgendered models posing in disgraceful listicles accompanied by kidnapped nude kittens?”

His column centers on the business of journalism in a new media world:

“Now that metrics are part of the news agenda, all of the sticks are in the air. Just because something is popular does not make it worthy, but ignoring audience engagement is a sure route to irrelevance.”

@carr2n concludes his opinion piece with a cat picture.

Why not?

But my cat pic is better than his.

#BreakingNews #Developing #JustIn #Exclusive:

Meet my neighbor: Holy Gotham City, Batman! – the Caped Crusader uncovered:

Cat  Journalism News Clicks Business

Look at the shadow: Bat-Cat. #NewJournalism

Look at the shadow. Bat-cat.

New-media journalism “click.”

Some reporters and firms struggle in the new media balance of engagement and journalism.

Others thrive.

My tip: all things in moderation, strategically.

Follow your plan.

Your have one, right?

 


Twitter: @schwartznow

Digital Hubs:  Here or Here

Web’s 25th: Basic Human Rights

March 12, 2014

On the open internet and the free web

David Foster, deputy head of CERN’s IT department, is an early web contributor.

On this the 25th anniversary of the web, he shares some opinions:

“The web has evolved from simple information sharing to transacting business through socialising and more recently collaborative problem solving in citizen cyber science. In these ways it harnesses the capabilities of humanity to do what we do best; share, learn, collaborate and innovate.”

“Basic human rights.”
David Foster. Source: CERN

In an opinion piece, Foster cautions:

“However, with this capability comes considerable responsibility. Basic human rights – including the right to freedom of expression and the protection of privacy – all need to be balanced and preserved in order that this incredible resource can be a safe and exciting place for creativity for people of all ages and interests.”

Who is he addressing?

“This responsibility rests with all of us – whether politicians, lawmakers, scientists or citizens – to ensure that the incredible progress we have made in the last 25 years, starting with the work of a few, and now capturing the innovations of many, can continue in an open, trusted, safe, free and fair way.”

 “All of us.”

The Internet Goes "Dark"

January 18, 2012
Wikipedia, Google Join Historic Campaign against SOPA and PIPA

It’s described as the largest online protest in history.

Websites went “dark” in a demonstration against separate anti-piracy bills moving through the U.S. Senate and House, respectively. The acronym for the House legislation is SOPA; the Senate’s is PIPA.

The English version of web giant Wikipedia led the way.

According to comScore, 25-million people a day visit Wikipedia. This message greeted them:

Wikipedia Protests SOPA and PIPA

Wikipedia could still be accessed in French, Spanish, German, Russian and other languages.

Google went “dark,” with a symbolic visual. A call-to-action appeared when I placed my cursor over it:

Google Goes “Dark”

WordPress, one of my blogging tools, joined the online protest, censoring itself. Here is its home page:

WordPress Censors Itself

Flickr participated, too. The photo service asked me if I wanted to join the online, “awareness” campaign:

Flickr Campaign Message
Neither Facebook nor Twitter are involved in the massive campaign. Here are some engaged websites.
So far, my ability to use the Internet remains unaffected.

Still, it’s an incredible show of Internet muscle, a huge digital-billboard-like campaign.

UPDATE NO. 1:
Congress indefinitely postponed anti-piracy legislation on Jan. 20, 2012. According to the Associated Press:

“The demise, at least for the time being, of the anti-piracy bills was a clear victory for Silicon Valley over Hollywood… .” Full story here.


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