Archive for the ‘Crisis Management’ Category

Snapchat Lied. Now This.

May 30, 2014

Snapchat CEO ‘Mortified’ by Leaked Stanford Frat E-Mails

Sarah Frier writing for Bloomberg:

“Snapchat Inc. Chief Executive Officer Evan Spiegel apologized for e-mails he sent during his fraternity days that celebrated getting drunk and convincing sorority women to perform sexual acts.”

Earlier this month, Snapchat settled with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.

Because “snaps” on its service do not disappear.

As advertised.

So, Snapchat lied and settled.

Now this.

Snapchat and its CEO are building quite a reputation.

More accurately, a reputation crisis.

To think Snapchat spurned a multibillion-dollar buyout offer from Facebook.

Perhaps Facebook got off lucky.

 

 


Twitter: @schwartznow

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Digital Advertising’s Crisis

March 24, 2014

A ‘Crisis’ in Online Ads: One-Third of Traffic Is Bogus

Suzanne Vranica with Mike Shields writing in The Wall Street Journal:

“About 36% of all Web traffic is considered fake, the product of computers hijacked by viruses and programmed to visit sites, according to estimates cited recently by the Interactive Advertising Bureau trade group.”

Bots, click fraud, fake traffic.

It’s widespread, says The WSJ.

With a catch: your company must be online.

There’s no choice, right?:

“Spending on digital advertising—which includes social media and mobile devices—is expected to rise nearly 17% to $50 billion in the U.S. this year. That would be about 28% of total U.S. ad spending. Just five years ago, digital accounted for 16%.”

So, ditching the digital marketplace is a hard sell.

After all, it’s growing by double digits.

But what do you tell your CEO when asked:

“Can you prove to me our ad dollars are not wasted due to fraud?”

Monitor and audit all you want.

Right now, however, assume some of your online ad budget is squandered.

Misspent monies.

Inform your CEO.

And demand recompense. Restitution.

Insist on proof that consumers signed up for services, products or deals advertised.

Without the evidence, here’s a current best practice:

“Few marketers say they plan to cut back on digital advertising. Instead advertisers are getting more aggressive in monitoring what they are getting and in demanding reimbursement if fraud is uncovered.”

I would also tie your media buyer’s compensation to “make goods.” Free ad space.

Digital advertising is becoming a bigger slice of the marketing pie.

But your firm’s bottom line is involved.

And is your CEO’s reputation.

Your best strategy is planning and reporting online advertising tactics and results with credibility.

Credibility demands honesty.

And, honestly, there is fraud online.

Digital domination may be in the cards.

Ignoring fake traffic need not be.


Twitter: @schwartznow

Digital Hubs:  Here or Here

Blocking Twitter Trolls Harder

December 12, 2013

Blocking Twitter Users

Thought you blocked one of those Twitter trolls (or worse).

Not really. Read Twitter’s new policy closely:

Note: If your account is public, blocking a user does not prevent that user from following you, interacting with your Tweets, or receiving your updates in their timeline.”

You won’t see blocked users.

Their troll content, however, can still be seen.

And retweeted.

And searched.

Your choice?

Start over.

Go private.

Lock your account.

I know. Not much of a choice.

Twitter is now a public company.

The company wants your trolls (or worse) to remain public.

Update — Twitter “reverts” change:

Source: Twitter

“Earlier today, we made a change to the way the ‘block’ function of Twitter works. We have decided to revert the change after receiving feedback from many users – we never want to introduce features at the cost of users feeling less safe. Any blocks you had previously instituted are still in effect.”

“Revert”?

New level of corporate spin.

After Twitter creates a crisis.

Issues remain: balancing privacy, reputations, safety … and the wrath of the ticked off trolls you block.

Thoughts about Tornado "Tourism"

January 22, 2012
Tornado Tourism Maps: Controversy in Joplin, Mo.

“Tornado Tourism.” It’s apparently the next phase of a natural-disaster, at least in Joplin, Mo.

The city’s Convention & Visitors Bureau now has maps highlighting spots of special viewing interest from the horrific EF5 tornado of May 2011 that killed 161 people.

Local hotels are handing out the maps, too.

A spokesman says the maps are not meant to capitalize on the destruction, but to provide education.

Local residents disagree. Read the comments on the Facebook page of Joplin radio station Newstalk 1310.

And some 700 people to date have “liked” another Facebook page, Joplin Citizens Against Tornado Tours.

So the perception is that the maps are about tourism. Not education.

And this perception, real or not, is now the reality.

The other reality? There was nothing to like about the Joplin tornado. Watch this video, especially the end:

In crisis management training, I talk about the general stages of a disaster:

  • Preparation / Training
  • The event
  • The aftermath
  • The response
  • Recovery
  • Lessons learned / Training
  • “Anniversary” coverage, (e.g., “It’s been one year since… .”)

In addition to the loss of life, the Joplin tornado caused more than a billion dollars in damage.

Eaten to the ground were entire neighborhoods.

A damage map from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is jaw-dropping.

And now the tragedy is the stuff of an apparent new phase in natural disasters: “Disaster tourism.” Follow the map – see destruction.

There are lessons and memories from the Joplin tornado that should never be forgotten.

The community needs to recover, first.

Yes, the event should become a “living” source of education and awareness, too.

But people need to rebuild, and decide how best to honor memories through future generations.

And do so before tourist buses and “looky-loos” decide their own paths.

Supporting a long-term recovery featuring compassion, sensitivity and respect would seem to be a better role for the Convention & Visitors Bureau…than “education” maps about this tornado.

Healing a community should come before any appearance of promoting historic tragedy.

After all, as it says on the front-page of the Bureau’s website: “Welcome to Joplin…We’re Just Right.”

Show us “right.”


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