Archive for the ‘Clouds’ Category

Air “Bombs”: Gnarly Weather

June 27, 2014

Gnarly Sky Telegraphs Meteorological Air “Bombs.”

Posted this on Tumblr. Sharing here, too. Hey, WordPress, Yahoo is easier:

Mammatus Virga Colorado T-Storm

Gnarly Virga – Mammatus under T-Storm: Windy Downbursts

Gnarly sky under a T-storm.

Rain evaporating in dry air on the way down.

Dramatic, ragged cloud structures.

Potentially dangerous.

Violent wind “air bombs,” gusty downbursts up to 60mph or more possible.

Another view:

Inverted Mammatus Virga J

“Inverted” view Virga – Mammatus Wind Downburst

Same pic using photoshop feature “inverted.”

No rain.

But evaporating rain on the way down rocked my house, like an air bomb.

Airplane travel impacted into Denver International Airport, where a Severe Weather Warning was issued by the National Weather Service.

Air “bombs” – downbursts – are both gnarly and dangerous.

A sight to see.

And feel.

Blown away.

So, now: seeing is knowing.


Twitter: @schwartznow

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Social Media Sunsets

March 20, 2014

Sunsets Light Up Social Media

Looking for quality, online content?

Look up.

Then share your view.

Sunrises, sunsets, weather, nature, the sky, clouds.

I could see the ingredients coming together.

So much so, I issued a “Sunset Watch” on Twitter:

Jeff Schwartz Sunset Watch Twitter

Believe I invented the “Sunset Watch.” Copyrighting the idea.

Sure enough, looking west:

Sunset Colorado Jeff Schwartz

Sunset lights up mountain-wave cloud. Looking west.

Looking east:

Sunset Colorado Jeff Schwartz

Orange and purple. Looking east.

As sunrises and sunsets approach, watch the online world, worldwide.

Amateur photographers start posting amazing content.

Content that is widely retweeted and favorited.

My Tweetdeck and Facebook walls light up, as people look up.

Newsrooms enjoy fresh visuals.

So do your followers.

I’ve had pics shared by journalists and meteorologists globally.

Family and friends rely on me to cover Colorado’s sky glory, too.

I know you love what I call your “selfie-content.”

Try self-taken sunrise and sunset pics, instead.

Show off the horizon facing you vs. your face.

Your social media community will thank you.

The clicks and shares provide proof.

I think TV stations need dedicated sunset web cams.

Until then, follow me on social media.

Watch for my “Sunrise Watches.”

Share your views.

Get more viewers.

 


Twitter: @schwartznow

Digital Hubs:  Here or Here

What Was Over Atlanta?

February 25, 2014

Cool Clouds Over Atlanta

Cloud show during Atlanta rush hour. Source: @ScottTufts

Meteorologist @JenCarfagno of The Weather Channel said “undulatus asperatus” clouds put on the display that lit up social media:

“Undulatus asperatus translates to ‘roughened waves’ – Looks like an angry sea, doesn’t it?” 

Science writer and meteorologist Anthony Sagliani of Accuweather said a gravity wave packet created the awesome cloud structure:

“Gravity wave packet” over Georiga. Source: @anthonywx 

Here’s another view from Jeremy Campbell of 11Alive.com:

Source: Jeremy Campbell @Jeremy11alive

Per Wikipedia:

“Undulatus asperatus (or alternately, asperatus) is a cloud formation, proposed in 2009 as a separate cloud classification by the founder of the Cloud Appreciation Society. If successful it will be the first cloud formation added since cirrus intortus in 1951 to the International Cloud Atlas of the World Meteorological Organization.”

Got my vote.

Neat science.

Cool clouds.

Noctilucent Cloud Outbreak

May 31, 2013

Luminous Electric-Blue “Night-Shining” Tendrils

Per SpaceWeather:

Noctilucent clouds form near the top of Earth’s polar atmosphere when water vapor from the planet below mixes with meteor debris from space. They appear during summer because that is when the mesosphere is coldest and most humid. This year, they appeared early, more than a full month before the solstice, setting the stage for an unusually good NLC-watching season.

High-latitude watchers should be alert for repeat shows.

Colorado, too.

Look west 30-to-60 minutes after sunset.

And if you see blue-white tendrils?

Weather-science cool.


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